1229 The Forest, Goochland, VA 23039

11.44 Acres in The Forest! Enjoy the peacefulness and rural feel that Goochland offers with the conveniences of Shops, Restaurants and Fitness Locations a short distance away in Greengate and West Creek. The Forest offers quiet roads for walks and a beautiful lake for recreational boating and fishing. Bring your builder or purchase as a future getaway place.

Source Article

Property History for 8334 Cathedral Forest Dr

8334 Cathedral Forest Dr, Fairfax Station, VA 22039
8334 Cathedral Forest Dr, Fairfax Station, VA 22039
Property Tax
Year Taxes Land Additions Total Assessment 2017 $9,576 $541,000 + $292,330 = $833,330 2016 $9,555 $529,000 + $295,770 = $824,770 2015 $8,936 $519,000 + $281,690 = $800,690

The price and tax history data displayed is obtained from public records and/or MLS feeds from the local jurisdiction. Contact your REALTOR® directly in order to obtain the most up-to-date information available.

Nearby Home Values

Source Article

Property History for 5319 Hampton Forest Way

5319 Hampton Forest Way, Fairfax, VA 22030
5319 Hampton Forest Way, Fairfax, VA 22030
Property Tax
Year Taxes Land Additions Total Assessment 2017 $6,056 $182,000 + $301,580 = $483,580 2016 $6,459 $227,000 + $330,540 = $557,540 2015 $6,050 $217,000 + $325,110 = $542,110

The price and tax history data displayed is obtained from public records and/or MLS feeds from the local jurisdiction. Contact your REALTOR® directly in order to obtain the most up-to-date information available.

Nearby Home Values

Source Article

14119 Forest Creek Dr, Chesterfield, VA 23113

Welcome to 14119 Forest Creek Drive in the River Downs subdivision! Walking distance to Robious Landing Park which provides easy access to the James River for kayaking, canoeing, rowing and fishing. Well built Parker, Lancaster and Orleans constructed home in 2002. Conveniently located close to 288. Home offers 3 levels on a large cul-de-sac lot with aggregate driveway. 9 foot ceilings, hardwood floors throughout most of the first floor. New paint! Crown molding and recessed lighting is also consistent throughout most of the entire home. Formal dining room with bay window. Kitchen with gas range, double oven, Corian countertops, tile backsplash, ceramic tile floors, crown molding, and recessed lighting! Morning room with vaulted ceiling that overlooks the rear yard. Living room offers wall of windows for great natural light and gas fireplace. Also on the first floor is a corner office with French doors. Upstairs is the large Master’s suite and three bedrooms. Third floor offers two additional rooms and a full bathroom. 3-car garage! Huge rear deck. Detached storage shed. Irrigation system. Gutter guards. Second floor carpet will be replaced prior to closing at seller’s expense.

Source Article

Forest Hill’s cheeky Tiki spot, Little Nickel, brings vacation vibes to South Side

Loretta Montano, who’s also the chef at Stella’s Grocery, created menu items like the Hawaiian bowl at Little Nickel.

Personality is an important element of any restaurant. When done well, the interior design and its flourishes perform in concert with the menu. Little Nickel gets this and knows how to do it well.

Designer Dean Giavos, son of prolific restaurateurs Johnny and Katrina Giavos, is a master when it comes to lovingly creating a space that is not bashful about its personality or sense of humor. That includes clever menu jokes, like at Continental and Perly’s, and signs like one in Little Nickel’s pink bathrooms that warn visitors not to flush Chainsmokers’ CDs, fidget spinners or Cleveland Browns jerseys down the toilet.

Little Nickel’s name nods to the now Seven-Nickel Bridge and adds to the impressive Giavos restaurant empire with a Tiki-inspired vibe. Chef Loretta Montano, also of Stella’s Grocery, crafted a menu that artfully blends a wide range of culinary influences including Philippine, Hawaiian, and Mediterranean with a base of classic diner. It’s the kind of place where you expect to hear "Mele Kalikimaka" playing unironically at the holidays. A lot of fusion is happening here, and I recommend avoiding the impulse to analyze it all, lest you miss a good meal from a range of options under the umbrella of "vacation food," in the words of Dean Giavos. Think of the Nickel as a place that has a creative flavor palette and knows how to play well thanks to Montano’s imaginative spirit and breadth of experience.

For starters, you can’t go wrong with the lumpia ($6), a Philippine spring roll good for date-night splitting. It passed the toughest authenticity test, says chef Loretta Montano, who asked her husband how she fared in recreating a dish she first ate at his family gatherings. Our table also tried the Hawaiian nachos ($11) with pork, which came in an incredibly generous portion, fit to feed either a large happy hour party or the Virginia National Guard. Pineapple, you might have guessed, made these nachos Hawaiian, but the white cheddar and queso made them memorably delicious. If you’re feeling adventurous, the pu-pu platters range from General Tso’s wings to pineapple skewers.

Pay attention to the sandwich menu. The options are wallet-friendly and include some intentional pairings between breads. The lamb cheese steak ($11) is served on a hoagie roll from local baker Flour Garden. Other sandwiches — like the patty melt club ($10) — are on breads from Lyon Bakery in Washington. The Ipanema ($9), a vegetarian option, was my personal favorite with its melt of Gruyere cheese and lemon aioli with sweet potato, kale and caramelized onion on multigrain.

The beverage menu includes some of the most entertaining glassware I’ve seen in town. Cocktails ($9-12) like the Saturn, served in a faux coconut shell, are easy to savor with a heavier container. Bail Money and Naval Base Baby also have great flavor profiles. The Winterspice Painkiller ($12) reigns over the menu in price and comes in an imposing dark Tiki glass. For my taste, it was a tad strong and a hint medicinal, but I can understand the appeal for folks who prefer a spice-forward libation, especially on a cold night. And it’s executed well in the true Tiki tradition of house-made syrups.

As for main courses, the salmon l’orange ($15), one of several gluten-free options, was sumptuous, prepared with an orange-honey-ginger glaze. The dish felt slightly shortchanged, coming with only a bed of rice. Adding a green vegetable would have rounded it out nicely. The Hawaiian pork bowl ($13) is a reprise of most of the great cast members from the nachos, but substitutes coconut black beans for the chips. It was equally as good and can easily make a second meal with leftovers.

Build-your-own lamb shank tacos ($16) come with the lamb shank ready to carve, and there’s also a whole fish option. The tacos were delicious, but know that some assembly is required, in case that’s a deal breaker.

Your visit should definitely end with a slice of the coconut cream pie ($6), a perfect combination of light, airy and sweet. This particular pie, along with the other dessert options, is exclusive to Little Nickel, and it’s worth the trip.

A few more exciting things are in the offing at Little Nickel, including the debut of a brunch menu on Saturday and Sunday mornings. Chef Loretta Montano also wants to hold occasional special events like roasting a whole pig, luau style. And plans are afoot to add outdoor seating.

What’s also cool to see is when a lengthy wait time during the gold rush at Little Nickel pays dividends for O’Toole’s, an old staple of the neighborhood. A rising tide does lift all boats.

"We actually enjoy seeing that," says co-owner Katrina Giavos. "Anytime we’ve opened up a place, we believe it’s important to support the neighborhood. The more that opened up, the more people came and that’s good for everyone."

Little Nickel’s personality stands out, but the menu’s variety is equally impressive. It’s a great neighborhood spot, and Little Nickel might be just the change Forest Hill needs to lure more people across the bridge to experience South Side. S

Little Nickel
Mondays – Saturdays , 11 a.m. – 11 p.m.
4702 Forest Hill Ave.
230-8743

Source Article

U.S. Forest Service prepares for controlled burns in W.Va. forest lands

ELKINS, W.Va. — When the weather finally cooperates officials with the U.S. Forest Service plan to set fire to 5,000 acres of the Monongahela National Forest in West Virginia. The prescribed fires will be carefully planned to effectively improve the forest for wildlife and reduce the chances for an enormous fire in the future.

“Fire managers work with our wildlife biologists, hydrologists, and all of the different resources areas to figure out the very best conditions in terms of forest moisture in the leaves and sticks on the ground and the weather,” said Monongahela National Forest Public Information Specialist Julie Fosbender. “We want to make sure when we conduct a prescribed fire, we get the results we want that will benefit wildlife habitat.”

The idea of a controlled burn is to consume ground materials like leaves, fallen limbs, dead and decaying trees and small plants. Controlled fires tend to burn cooler than a wildfire and do no damage to large standing timber. According to Fosbender allowing the ground litter and fuel to accumulate only insure when there is a fire it will burn hot and fast and caused widespread forest destruction.

“Our goal is to burn the leaf litter, the sticks, and small vegetation,” she explained. “If you have a thick fern layer you can get rid of that and allow those oak seedlings to grow. You try to get rid of that lower layer of the forest.”

There are plans for six separate prescribed burns, mostly on the eastern slopes. The locations will stretch from the area of Circleville south to White Sulphur Springs. Dates and times for the burns remain tentative and are very weather dependent. You can follow the plans at the U.S. Forest Service Incident Command Website.

Chris Lawrence

clawrence@wvradio.com

@wvoutdoors

chris.lawrence.9822

chris_lawrence_metronews

Chris Lawrence is the anchor of the MetroNews Morning News, heard weekday mornings from 6-9 a.m. on MetroNews stations across West Virginia. Chris is also the host of the award-winning West Virginia Outdoors, heard Saturday mornings at 7 a.m. across the network. Chris has won numerous awards for coverage of hunting and fishing.

Source Article

Over 70,000 sign petitions protesting pipelines in Virginia

RICHMOND, Va. — Environmentalists on Tuesday dropped on Gov. Ralph Northam’s desk petitions signed by more than 70,000 people supporting stricter rules for the Mountain Valley and Atlantic Coast pipelines that energy companies plan to build across Virginia.

One petition, signed by 10,000 Virginian residents, demands that the Northam administration immediately halt the tree-felling along the pipeline routes and let the public comment on the companies’ plans to control erosion and stormwater before they are finalized by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality.

Activists also gave Northam an online petition signed by more than 62,000 citizens from around the country calling on Northam to stop the pipelines, which they said would threaten the Blue Ridge Parkway, the Appalachian Trail and miles of national forest land. By late Tuesday, the number of signatures on the Change.org petition had topped 65,500.

The Chesapeake Climate Action Network, the Virginia chapter of the Sierra Club and other groups held a press conference on the state Capitol grounds the morning after the DEQ approved the Mountain Valley Pipeline.

Outraged by that action, the environmentalists said the DEQ must require the companies to take better precautions when constructing the pipelines. The activists said that will happen only if Northam gets involved.

“It’s time for you to be the leader that we voted for,” LeeAnne Williams, a Virginia Sierra Club volunteer, said, addressing the governor.

Some activists said they have already seen negative effects of the pipeline from the cutting of trees. “The proposed pipelines have altered people’s lives, land value and emotional well-being,” said Lara Mack, Virginia field organizer for Appalachian Voices.

The Atlantic Coast Pipeline would carry natural gas 600 miles from West Virginia to North Carolina, and the Mountain Valley Pipeline would run more than 300 miles from northwestern West Virginia to southern Virginia. If built as proposed, the pipelines would cross streams and other bodies of water more than 1,400 times, environmentalists say.

David Sligh, conservation director for Wild Virginia, said the state should review the environmental impact at each of those water crossings. He said pollution from the pipeline could cause “permanent damage to the aquatic systems.”

The companies that want to build the pipelines say the projects are crucial to meeting the energy needs of Virginia and the mid-Atlantic region.

“Demand for natural gas is growing across the region – to produce cleaner electricity and support economic development – but there is not enough infrastructure to deliver the supplies needed to meet this demand,” the consortium that has proposed the Atlantic Coast Pipeline says on its website.

The consortium, which includes Dominion Energy, says the pipeline construction would create 17,000 jobs and provide a “major boost to local businesses in every community.”

In a recent monthly newsletter, the company building the Mountain Valley Pipeline said it plans to have the pipeline in service by the end of the year.

This story was produced by the Virginia Commonwealth University’s Capital News Service.

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Source Article

Thursday night obituary update

The following obituaries have been provided by local funeral homes. Read our complete obituaries in The Herald-Dispatch on Friday and at www.herald-dispatch.com.

GEORGE WASHINGTON ALDRIDGE, 77, of Ashland, husband of Versell Blair Aldridge, died Feb. 27 in St. Mary’s Medical Center. He was a retired fire protection specialist with AirGas. There will be a Celebration of Life at 1 p.m., Saturday, New Beginnings Church, 2001 Fort Gay Rd., Fort Gay; burial will follow in Elmwood Cemetery. Visitation will be one hour prior to services at the church. Morris Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

MAE CAUDILL, 98, of Topmost, Ky., widow of William Caudill, died March 7 in Pikeville (Ky.) Medical Center. Funeral service will be 1 p.m. Saturday, Nelson-Frazier Funeral Home Chapel, Hindman, Ky.; burial in Rene Hall Cemetery. Visitation will be after 6 p.m. Thursday and all day Friday at the funerla home. www.nelsonfrazierfuneralhome.com.

ORA VIRGIE COLLINS, 75, of South Point, Ohio, died Thursday in Harbor Healthcare of Ironton. Funeral service will be 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Chapman’s Mortuary, Huntington; burial will be in Forest Memorial Park, Milton. Visitation will be after 1:30 p.m. Sunday at the funeral home. www.chapmans-mortuary.com.

STEVEN EDWARD DALTON, 35, of Oil Springs, Ky., husband of Heather Stidham Dalton, died March 6 at home. He was self-employed at Broadway Exhaust. Funeral service will be 2 p.m. Friday, Preston Funeral Home Chapel, Paintsville, Ky.; burial following in Dalton Family Cemetery, Oil Springs, Ky. Visitation will be after 9 a.m. Friday at the funeral home.

MILLARD F. DONNELLY, 74, of Kenova, husband of Pauline Blair Donnelly, died March 6 at home. He was a self employed roofer. Funeral services will be 3 p.m. Monday, Rollins Funeral Home, Kenova. Visitation will be two hours before the service. Burial will be in Maple Hill Cemetery, Kenova.

LEANNA KEY FORD, 102, of Kenova died March 5 in River’s Bend Health Care, South Point, Ohio. She had worked for Appalachian Power. There will be a celebration of life, 3 p.m. Sunday, Rollins Funeral Home, Kenova. Visitation will be two hours before the service. Memorial donations may be made to River’s Bend Health Care, 335 Jefferson Avenue, South Point, OH 45680.

HAROLD FRAZIER, 75, of Louisa, Ky., husband of Mary Frazier, died March 8. He was a retired inspector for AK Steel. Funeral service will be noon Saturday, Young Funeral Home Chapel, Louisa, Ky.; burial in Frazier Cemetery, Clifford, Ky. Visitation will be after 3 p.m. Friday at the funeral home.

JERRY NEAL GALLIMORE, 71, of Huntington husband of Donna Keyser Gallimore, died March 3. He was a retired Master Sergeant with the United States Air Force. Funeral service will be noon Saturday, Henson and Kitchen Mortuary, Barboursville. Visitation will be one hour before service Saturday at the funeral home. www.hensonandkitchen.com.

JOHN "MIKE" GEE, 75, of Ironton, widower of Brenda Gee, died March 6 in Cornerstone Hospital. He had worked at Ironton Iron. There will be a memorial service at the convenience of the family. Donations may be made to Phillips Funeral Home, 1004 South 7th Street Ironton, OH 45638 to help with funeral expenses www.phillipsfuneralhome.net

JEAN PRESTON HATCHER of Ashland, widow of Robert E. Hatcher, died March 6. Funeral service will be 2 p.m. Sunday, Steen Funeral Home Central Avenue Chapel; burial in Rose Hill Burial Park. Visitation will be one hour before service. Memorials may be made to First Baptist Church, Ashland. www.steenfuneralhome.com.

LILLIAN V. HENDRICKS, 91, of Huntington, widow of Forest A. Hendricks, died, March 7, Cabell Huntington Hospital. Chapman’s Mortuary is in charge of arrangements, which are incomplete.

TAMI JO HORD, 60, of Ironton, died March 7 in St. Mary’s Medical Center, Huntington. Slack and Wallace Funeral Home, South Point, Ohio is assisting the family with arrangements, which are incomplete. www.slackandwallace.com.

RUBY WRIGHT BRUMFIELD IRBY, 93, of Huntington, widow of Charley Brumfield Sr. and Alton Irby, died March 5 in Emogene Dolin Jones Hospice House. Visitation will be from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. Saturday, Rollins Funeral Home, Kenova. Funeral services will begin immediately following the visitation. Burial will be in Forest Lawn Cemetery. Huntington.

WILLIAM JOSEPH KAIRY SR., 76, of Barboursville died March 6 in St. Mary’s Medical Center. Funeral mass will be at noon Monday, St. Joseph Catholic Church; burial will be in the Donel C. Kinnard Memorial State Veterans Cemetery, Dunbar, W.Va. Visitation will be from 9 to 11 a.m. Monday at the Wallace Funeral Home, Barboursville, with the procession to the church leaving at 11:30 a.m.

GORDON DALE KESLER, 59, of Milton, husband of Sharon Kesler, died March 7 in Cabell Huntington Hospital. Service will be noon Monday, Heck Funeral Home, Milton; burial in White Chapel Memorial Gardens, Barboursville. Visitation will be one hour before service. www.heckfuneralhome.com

KATHRYN LOUESE McCLUNG MERRY, 90, of Huntington, widow of Amos Gordon Merry Jr., died March 3 in Woodlands Retirement Community, Huntington. Funeral service will be 2 p.m., Saturday, Klingel-Carpenter Mortuary. Private committal service follows. Visitation will be one hour before service. Memorials may be made to an organization of your choice. www.klingelcarpenter.com

EMORY RIDENOIR OSBURN, 89, of Lavalette, husband of Dot Taylor Osburn, died March 7 in St. Mary’s Medical Center. He retired from the saw mill and timber business and was a minister for 70 years. He was pastor at Patrick Old Regular Baptist Church and at the Lavalette Baptist Church of Jesus Christ. Funeral services will be 2 p.m. Sunday, Morris Funeral Home Chapel, Wayne; burial will follow at Community Memorial Gardens, Wayne. Visitation will be from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday at Morris Funeral Home.

ROSA DELORIS PATRICK, 51, of Logan, W.Va., daughter of Deloris June Criswell Hall of Whitman, W.Va., died March 8 in Genesis Healthcare, Logan, W.Va. She had been a restaurant worker. At her request, there are no services. Evans Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Chapmanville, W.Va., is assisting her family.

MORTON ANDREW PILCHER, 87 of Huntington, widower of Christine Pilcher, died March 1 in Wyngate at River’s Edge, Proctorville, Ohio. He was a retired real estate appraiser. There will be a memorial service, 5 p.m., Sunday, Reger Funeral Home. Burial will be 11 a.m. Monday, Donel C. Kinnard Memorial State Veterans Cemetery, Dunbar, W.Va. Visitation will be after 3 p.m. Sunday at the funeral home. www.regerfh.com.

MARY MARGARET PINKERMAN, 84, of Willow Wood, Ohio, died March 7 in St. Mary’s Medical Center, Huntington. Funeral service will be 11 a.m. Saturday, Hall Funeral Home and Crematory, Proctorville, Ohio; burial in Perkins Ridge Cemetery, Willow Wood, Ohio. Visitation will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday at the funeral home. www.ehallfuneralhome.com.

GARY RAY PORTER, 52, of Wayne, husband of Laura Ross Porter, died March 7 in Cabell Huntington Hospital. He was a retired Home Confinement Officer for Wayne County. Funeral services will be 2 p.m. Saturday, Morris Funeral Home Chapel, Wayne; burial will follow at Elmwood Cemetery Annex, Wayne. Visitation will be from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at the funeral home.

IMOGENE RICHARDSON, 88, of Ona died March 6. Funeral services will be 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Wallace Funeral Home, Milton; burial will be in Forest Memorial Park, Milton. Visitation will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday at the funeral home. www.timeformemory.com/wallace.

JESSICA FAYE SHARROCK, 35, of Ironton, granddaughter of Joyce Faye Belville of Ironton, died March 2. There will be a graveside committal service, 1 p.m., Friday, Community Cemetery. O’Keefe-Baker Funeral Home, Ironton, is assisting her family.

DWIGHT A. SMITH JR., 87, of Ashland, husband of Geneva Duncan Smith, died March 6 at home. He retired from Ashland Oil. There will be a graveside service, 1 p.m. Monday, Kentucky Veterans Cemetery North East. www.steenfuneralhome.com

INEZ MARIE THOMPSON, 85, of Chesapeake, Ohio, wife of Lawrence Thompson, died March 7 in Emogene Dolin Jones Hospice House. Funeral service will be 1 p.m. Saturday, Schneider-Hall Funeral Home, Chesapeake, Ohio; burial will follow in Spring Hill Cemetery, Huntington. Visitation will be one hour before service. www.schneiderhallfuneralhome.com.

DORIS JEAN WARD, 85, of Barboursville, died March 6. Funeral service will be 2 p.m., Monday, Wallace Funeral Home, Barboursville; burial in White Chapel Memorial Gardens, Barboursville. Visitation will be one hour before service. www.timeformemory.com/wallace.

MAXINE MARIE WILKES, 93, of Chesapeake, Ohio, died March 6 at home. Funeral service will be 2 p.m. Sunday, Schneider-Hall Funeral Home, Chesapeake, Ohio; burial in Highland Memorial Gardens, South Point, Ohio. Visitation will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday at the funeral home. www.schneiderhallfuneralhome.com.

ANNA LOIS OAKLEY WITHERSPOON, 90, formerly of Huntington, died Sunday, February 25, 2018 in Covington, Ga. There will be a visitation from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, March 9 at Ferrell-Chambers Funeral Home. Funeral services will be 1 p.m. Saturday, March 10 at Antioch Missionary Baptist Church. Burial will follow at White Chapel Memorial Gardens.

Source Article